Does Vitamin D Improve Blood Pressure in the Elderly?

Vitamin D Doesn't Improve Blood Pressure in Elderly
Vitamin D Doesn't Improve Blood Pressure in Elderly

(HealthDay News) – Vitamin D supplementation does not improve blood pressure (BP) in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Miles D. Witham, PhD, from the University of Dundee in the United Kingdom, and colleagues randomized 159 patients ≥70 years with isolated systolic hypertension (supine systolic BP>140mmHg and supine diastolic BP <90mmHg) and baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <30ng/mL to receive 100,000 U of oral cholecalciferol or placebo every three months for one year. Office BP, 24-hour BP, arterial stiffness, endothelial function, cholesterol level, insulin resistance, and B-type natriuretic peptide level were measured during the 12 months.

The researchers found that the mean baseline office systolic BP was 163/78mmHg and mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 18ng/mL. Despite significant increases in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in the treatment group, there were no significant treatment effects seen for mean office BP at three months or for any of the secondary outcomes (24-hour BP, arterial stiffness, endothelial function, cholesterol level, glucose level, and walking distance). There were no additional adverse events in the treatment group, and the total number of falls was non-significantly lower in the group receiving vitamin D.

"Vitamin D supplementation did not improve blood pressure or markers of vascular health in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension," the authors write.

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