Diabetes, Interarm BP Difference May Up Cardiac Risk

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Interarm BP Difference May Up Cardiac Risk in Diabetes
Interarm BP Difference May Up Cardiac Risk in Diabetes

(HealthDay News) — Interarm differences in systolic blood pressure (BP) in patients with diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, according to research published online on March 25 in Diabetes Care.

Christopher E. Clark, PhD, of the University of Exeter in the UK, and colleagues analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 727 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and 285 controls without diabetes. The authors sought to assess the association between interarm differences in BP and risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

The researchers found that interarm differences of ≥10mm Hg in systolic BP in patients with diabetes were associated with increased risk of peripheral arterial disease (odds ratio [OR], 3.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–9.3). Interarm differences of ≥15mm Hg in systolic BP in patients with diabetes were associated with increased risk of diabetic retinopathy (OR, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.5–21.6) and chronic kidney disease (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 1.7–29.8). Interarm differences in systolic BP were associated prospectively with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratios: ≥10mm Hg, 3.5 [95% CI, 1.0–13.0] and ≥15mm Hg, 9.0 [95% CI, 2.0–41.0]).

"In the population with diabetes, systolic differences may be associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality," the authors write.

Abstract
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