Depression Linked to Worse Bypass Grafting Outcomes

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Depression Linked to Worse Bypass Grafting Outcomes
Depression Linked to Worse Bypass Grafting Outcomes

(HealthDay News) — For patients with established ischemic heart disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), depression is associated with increased mortality and poor cardiovascular outcomes, according to a study published in the September 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Malin Stenman, from the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, and colleagues evaluated data from a nationwide, population-based, cohort of all 56,064 patients who underwent primary, isolated, nonemergent CABG in Sweden from 1997–2008. Other national registries were used to cross-link individual-level data, including depression status and outcomes.

The researchers found that 0.6% of patients had depression before CABG. During a mean follow-up of 7.5 years, 35 percent of patients with depression and 25% of controls died. There was a significant association between depression and increased mortality (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.65) and with the combined end point of death or rehospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or stroke (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.61).

"In conclusion, we found a strong and significant association between depression and long-term survival in patients with established ischemic heart disease who underwent CABG," the authors write.

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