CRC Resection Morbidity, Mortality Still Higher for Elderly

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CRC Resection Morbidity, Mortality Still Higher for Elderly
CRC Resection Morbidity, Mortality Still Higher for Elderly

(HealthDay News) — Despite an overall improved mortality seen during the past 10 years, advancing age is associated with higher morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer resection, according to a study published online April 9 in JAMA Surgery.

Mehraneh D. Jafari, MD, from the University of California Irvine School of Medicine in Orange, and colleagues examined the surgical trends and outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment in the elderly. Operative outcomes for colorectal cancer were reviewed using data for 1,043,108 patients from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2001 through 2010.

The researchers found that, during the study period, mortality decreased by a mean of 6.6%, with the largest decrease observed among those aged ≥85 years (9.1%). Compared with patients aged <65 years, those aged ≥80 years had an associated $9,492 higher hospital charge and a 2.5-day increased length of stay. The risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality was increased in patients with advancing age compared with those aged 45–65 years, with odds ratios of 1.32, 2.02, 2.51, 3.15, and 4.72 for those aged 65–69, 70–74, 75–79, 80–84, and ≥85 years (P<0.01). Higher risk-adjusted morbidity was also seen in those with advancing age compared with those aged 45–65 years, with odds ratios of 1.25, 1.40, 1.54, 1.68, and 1.96, respectively (P<0.01).

"Despite the overall improved mortality seen during the past 10 years, the risk-adjusted mortality and morbidity of the elderly continue to be substantially higher than that for the younger population," the authors write.

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