Common Antibacterial Chemical Promotes Liver Tumor Growth in Animal Study

the MPR take:

5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol, also known as triclosan, is a synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial compound used in consumer products (including soaps, cosmetics, therapeutics, and plastics) that has been linked to hepatic tumors in mice in a new study. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, this research compared gene expression and histological and immunochemical parameters of male mice that were fed a chow diet containing either 0.08% triclosan or no triclosan for eight months. The mice fed triclosan had evidence of hepatocyte proliferation, fibrogenesis, and oxidative stress; this is believed to be a driving force for the development of advanced liver disease and triclosan-induced hepatic tumors in mice. Although use of triclosan has increased substantially in the last 20 years, recent studies indicate that it may interfere with various hormones as a weak endocrine disruptor and impair muscle contraction. This new research adds to growing concerns about adverse health effects associated with long-term exposure of triclosan and merits further analysis.

Common Antibacterial Chemical Promotes Liver Tumor Growth in Animal Study
Common Antibacterial Chemical Promotes Liver Tumor Growth in Animal Study

Triclosan [5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol; TCS] is a synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial chemical used in a wide range of consumer products including soaps, cosmetics, therapeutics, and plastics.

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