CDC: Use of Infertility Services Declining in the United States

CDC: Use of Infertility Services Declining in the United States
CDC: Use of Infertility Services Declining in the United States

(HealthDay News) – Use of infertility services among women has been declining in recent years in the United States, according to a report published Jan. 22 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Anjani Chandra, PhD, from the NCHS in Hyattsville, MD, and colleagues analyzed data on the use of infertility services from 22,682 interviews with men and women 15–44 years old from the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth.

The researchers found that 12% of women (7.3 million) or their husbands or partners reported ever using infertility services. Among women 25–44 years old, 17% (6.9 million) reported ever using infertility services, significantly less than the 20% reported in 1995. Among women with current fertility problems, 38% had ever used infertility services, significantly less than the 56% reported in 1982. The most common infertility services were advice, testing, medical help to prevent miscarriage, and ovulation drugs. Among men, 9.4% had ever used infertility services, similar to 2002 levels.

"In all survey years, ever-use of medical help to get pregnant was highest among older and nulliparous women, non-Hispanic white women, women with current fertility problems, and women with higher levels of education and household income," Chandra and colleagues write.

More Information

Loading links....