Can a Dissolving Fabric Prevent HIV in Women?

the MPR take:

Researchers at the University of Washington have discovered a new means of drug delivery for topical anti-HIV microbicides that could provide women better means of protection against HIV. While pre-exposure prophylaxis in the form of oral antiretroviral medications are currently used by individuals at risk of HIV infection, topical drugs are still in the development stage. One issue with topical anti-HIV microbicides is that they can be difficult to use and take at least 15 minutes to fully dissolve in the body pericoitally. In addition, the volume of the topic solution must be large enough to contain a full dose but small enough to prevent leakage. Here, the drug is manipulated using electrospinning and transformed into silk-like fibers with a high surface area to volume ratio that can deliver drugs in less than 6 minutes. This new fiber can hold 10 times the concentration of anti-HIV microbicides compared to other anti-HIV topical solutions in development. The researchers are currently testing a variety of anti-HIV drugs using the electrospinning technology.

Can a Dissolving Fabric Prevent HIV in Women?
Can a Dissolving Fabric Prevent HIV in Women?

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials.

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