BPA Replacement Could Be Just as Dangerous

the MPR take:

The FDA banned the use of bisphenol A (BPA) (a compound commonly used in plastics) in baby bottles in 2012 after research found that BPA mimicked estrogen and could impair brain and reproductive development in fetuses, infants, and children. However, a common BPA replacement, bisphenol S (BPS), has been shown in animal studies to also have the potential for harmful effects. One study found that BPS can upset normal cell functioning, even at picomolar concentrations of less than one part per trillion. This cell malfunctioning could lead to disorders such as asthma, birth defects, cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Other research on zebra fish, which have similar brain development to humans, discovered that BPS exposure led to a 240% increase in neural growth and caused extreme hyperactivity. Even a dose 1,000 times lower than the daily recommended amount for humans had this effect on the zebra fish. BPA and BPS in low concentrations have also been linked to arrhythmias in female, but not male, mice. Almost 81% of Americans have detectable levels of BPS in their urine but it is unlikely that BPS will be removed from the market due to a lack of industry and federal agency regulation.

BPA Replacement Could Be Just as Dangerous
BPA Replacement Could Be Just as Dangerous

In 2012 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of baby bottles that contain bisphenol A (BPA), a compound frequently found in plastics. Yet, recent research reveals that a common BPA replacement, bisphenol S (BPS), may be just as harmful. Deborah Kurrasch, from the University of Calgary, turned to zebra fish to study the effects of BPS on embryo development.

READ FULL ARTICLE From Scientific American

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