Bee Bacteria a Promising Antibiotic, Even Against MRSA

the MPR take:

Raw honey has been used throughout history as an antimicrobial agent, but little is known about its mechanism in fighting bacteria. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered thirteen novel bacterial microbiota, located in the stomach of bees, that have shown promise in fighting topical infections that include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). These Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species are present and active in all honeybees, and it is believed that they protect against incoming microbial threats introduced by nectar foraging. In laboratory tests, the bacteria counteracted a range of severe human wound pathogens; it also healed persistent wounds on ten horses that had failed to heal with other methods. The team hopes to expand this work to investigate the potential wider clinical use of this antimicrobial agent in both humans and animals against topical infections.

Bee Bacteria a Promising Antibiotic, Even Against MRSA
Bee Bacteria a Promising Antibiotic, Even Against MRSA

Thirteen lactic acid bacteria found in the honey stomach of bees have shown promising results in a series of studies at Lund University in Sweden. The group of bacteria counteracted antibiotic-resistant MRSA in lab experiments. The bacteria, mixed into honey, has healed horses with persistent wounds.

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