Apple's HealthKit to Be Pilot Tested for Glucose, Blood Pressure Monitoring in Major Hospitals

the MPR take:

Apple’s HealthKit will soon be tested in major U.S. hospitals for the tracking of patient vitals relating to chronic diseases, with a goal of evaluating the accuracy and speed of reporting data from patients to physicians. The first study of pediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes will be conducted at Stanford University Hospital using an iPod Touch and an FDA-approved glucose monitoring device to monitor blood glucose levels between doctor visits. The Stanford researchers state that in the future, physicians could set up alerts to patients when blood glucose levels fluctuate out of safe ranges using this system. Duke University is developing their own pilot study to track blood pressure, weight, and other measurements for patients with cancer or cardiovascular disease. Because the HealthKit can collect data from various health apps and connected devices, there are concerns regarding the potential for a breach of this private information from a single source, ie. the HealthKit’s Epic MyChart application. For HIPAA compliance regarding patient safety, Apple is considering a “HealthKit certification” for third party developers that could dictate secure data storage on devices and prohibit the sale of this data to advertisers. If the pilot studies are successful, doctors may be able to better monitor health data that can be difficult to obtain from patients remotely.

Apple's HealthKit to Be Pilot Tested for Glucose, Blood Pressure Monitoring in Major Hospitals
Apple's HealthKit to Be Pilot Tested for Glucose, Blood Pressure Monitoring in Major Hospitals

The Apple logo is pictured at its flagship retail store in San Francisco, California January 27, 2014. With a patient's consent, Apple's service gathers data from various health apps so that it can be viewed by doctors in one place. Duke University is developing a pilot to track blood pressure, weight and other measurements for patients with cancer or heart disease.

READ FULL ARTICLE From Reuters