A Treatment for Clozapine-Induced Sialorrhea?

the MPR take:

Sialorrhea is a common adverse effect associated with clozapine use, but a case study of four patients taking glycopyrrolate shows that it may be effective in alleviating drooling. Using the Thomas-Stonell and Greenberg Drooling Severity and Frequency Scale (DSFS) retrospectively to rate patients’ drooling, use of glycopyrrolate was effective in relieving clozapine-induced sialorrhea (CIS) in three of the four patients. In the fourth patient, mild improvement was noted initially. Glycopyrrolate is an antimuscarinic agent indicated to reduce chronic severe drooling in patients 3–16 years of age with neurologic conditions associated with problem drooling (eg, cerebral palsy) and as an adjunct therapy in the treatment of peptic ulcers.

Promising Drug for Benzodiazepine-Induced Sialorrhea
Promising Drug for Benzodiazepine-Induced Sialorrhea

Purpose: Four cases in which glycopyrrolate was used to treat clozapine-induced sialorrhea (CIS) are reported. Summary" Glycopyrrolate is an antimuscarinic agent that can be used preoperatively to inhibit drooling and excessive secretions of the respiratory tract. The outcomes of four patients who received glycopyrrolate for the treatment of CIS are described.

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