[11C]PiB PET Can Image Amyloid Deposits After TBI

[<sup>11</sup>C]PiB PET Can Image Amyloid Deposits After TBI
[11C]PiB PET Can Image Amyloid Deposits After TBI

(HealthDay News) – Carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B ([11C]PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) could be valuable in imaging amyloid deposition following traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a study published online Nov. 11 in JAMA Neurology.

Young T. Hong, PhD, from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and colleagues used [11C]PiB PET to image amyloid deposition in 11 controls (median age, 35 years) and 15 patients (median age, 33 years) within 361 days after a TBI. Immunocytochemistry in autopsy-acquired brain tissue was examined in 16 patients (median age, 46 years) who died between three hours and 56 days after a TBI and seven controls (median age, 61 years).

The researchers found that patients with TBI showed significantly increased [11C]PiB distribution volume ratios in cortical gray matter and the striatum, but not in the thalamus or white matter. Methodological confounders did not explain increases in [11C]PiB distribution volume ratios in patients with TBI that were replicated using comparisons of standardized uptake value ratios. Tritium-labeled PiB ([3H]PiB) binding was seen with autoradiography in neocortical gray matter in regions where amyloid deposition was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. However, where white matter showed Aβ and β-amyloid precursor protein by immunocytochemistry, no [3H]PiB binding was seen. There was no plaque-associated amyloid immunoreactivity or [3H]PiB binding seen in cerebellar gray matter in autopsy-acquired tissue from controls or patients.

"[11C]PiB shows increased binding following TBI," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial interests in the licensing of PiB technology.

Abstract
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