High Real-World SVR Rates for LDV/SOF in HCV/HIV Co-Infected Patients

High Real-World SVR Rates for LDV/SOF in HCV/HIV Co-Infected Patients
High Real-World SVR Rates for LDV/SOF in HCV/HIV Co-Infected Patients

NEW ORLEANS, LA—At IDWeek 2016, a group of researchers from Nassau University Medical Center presented that the overall sustained virologic response (SVR) rate for ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV co-infected patients in real world settings was 95.2%. 

The team, led by Bethel Shiferaw, MD, MPH, explained how literature suggests that HIV/HCV co-infected patients treated with oral HCV medications have SVR rates comparable to those of HCV-monoinfected patients. "However, there are limited data regarding effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for HIV/HCV co-infected patients in real-world clinical settings."

Study authors conducted a retrospective study to assess the efficacy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir in suppressing HCV viral load among HIV/HCV co-infected patients at a medical center in New York between December 2014 to December 2015. The primary outcome was SVR 12 weeks after completing HCV therapy (SVR12). Viral response was further assessed through variable such as HCV genotype, treatment-naive, cirrhosis, and baseline HCV viral load.

All patients included in the study (n=23) received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) where 96% had undetectable HIV viral load; mean CD4 count was 777 cells/mm3. The mean age of patients was 59 years old and most (74%) were African American. The authors reported that all patients had type 1 HCV genotype with 78% comprising the 1a genotype. 

The study data showed 95.2% achieved SVR with 83% SVR in caucasian and and 92% in male patients. No significant association between HCV baseline viral load and SVR were found. 

Among treatment-naive patients, the SVR rates were 100%, as was in genotype 1b patients, and "interestingly those with fibrosis/cirrhosis," noted Dr. Shiferaw. 

Findings from this analysis indicates that the single tablet ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was well-tolerated and resulted in high SVR rates in patients co-infected with HIV/HCV. Dr. Shiferaw concluded, "We recommend that collaborative efforts should focus on scaling up HCV treatment among HIV patients."

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