Short-Term Antiplatelet Tx No Worse Post-Zotarolimus Stent

TCT: Short-Term Antiplatelet Tx No Worse Post-Zotarolimus Stent
TCT: Short-Term Antiplatelet Tx No Worse Post-Zotarolimus Stent

(HealthDay News) – For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with zotarolimus-eluting stents, three months of antiplatelet therapy is non-inferior to 12 months of therapy, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics conference, held from Oct. 27–Nov. 1 in San Francisco.

Fausto Feres, MD, PhD, from the Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia in São Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues conducted a trial involving 3,119 patients with stable coronary artery disease or history of low-risk acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with zotarolimus-eluting stents. The authors sought to assess the non-inferiority of short-term (three months; 1,563 patients) vs. long-term (12 months; 1,556 patients) dual antiplatelet therapy.

The researchers found that 93 patients receiving short-term and 90 patients receiving long-term therapy had a net adverse clinical and cerebral event (NACCE: composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or major bleeding; P=0.002 for non-inferiority). At one year, there was no significant difference in the major adverse cardiac event (MACE) rates between the groups. There was no significant association found for NACCE, MACE, or stent thrombosis between 91 and 360 days.

"In patients with stable coronary artery disease or low-risk ACS treated with zotarolimus-eluting stents, three months of dual antiplatelet therapy was non-inferior to 12 months for NACCE, without significantly increasing the risk of stent thrombosis," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical and medical device companies, including Medtronic, which manufactures the Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stent used in the study and also funded the study.

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